Maternal Death

The Center works with state advocates throughout the country to promote and defend women's access to reproductive health care services in state legislatures and other policy-making bodies.  Our State Program work is critical because each year state legislatures consider hundreds of bills that would restrict abortion.  Anti-choice activists intentionally target states where they are likely to succeed in passing harmful legislation, and use those victories to push similar bills in other states and on the national level.  Indeed, much of the erosion of reproductive rights in this country has come as a result of state legislative action.  The Center's State Program pays particular attention to the impact that restrictive laws and policies have on marginalized women and women who face disproportionate difficulties in achieving meaningful access to reproductive health care. The State Program also assists activists seeking to proactively strengthen reproductive rights and improve access.   

Specifically, the Center's State Program provides legal analysis, technical support and strategic advice to state legislators, advocacy organizations and individuals who want to ensure that all women have meaningful access to safe and legal reproductive health services, including abortion and contraception.   This includes model legislation; talking points; written analyses and veto letters.

The Center's State Program also monitors and analyzes proposed state laws and policies that would affect women seeking reproductive health services. Read:

En Vedette

Spotlighting Racial Bias

In LaKeisha’s hometown of Atlanta, African American women die in childbirth at a rate more than three times the national average. Following an emergency c-section, LaKeisha experienced a brush with this unsettling statistic when she developed a…

Shaming El Salvador on the Global Stage

Manuela’s story is the stuff of nightmares. The young mother from El Salvador had not been feeling well for several years. She sought medical attention for what seemed to be tumors on her neck, but received no treatment or diagnosis—just some pain killers…

In Pursuit of Justice

Twenty-eight-year-old Alyne de Silva Pimentel, a poor Afro-Brazilian woman with a young daughter, was six months pregnant with her second child when she began to experience severe nausea and abdominal pain.  When her symptoms intensified, she sought help at a private health center…

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